Students’ ‘selfies’ to liven up school site

Future pupils have livened up the hoardings that cover the site of the new Henry Bloom Noble primary school on Westmoreland Road in Douglas

Future pupils have livened up the hoardings that cover the site of the new Henry Bloom Noble primary school on Westmoreland Road in Douglas

1
Have your say

Children have added a splash of colour to the site of their new school in Douglas.

In September next year the Henry Bloom Noble Primary School will move from the Victorian-era buildings in Tynwald Street and Demesne Road in Douglas to a new school on the site of the old Noble’s Hospital.

While work goes on to create the £9.5 million facility, pupils have added a unique touch to the safety hoardings that are being used to screen the site from view.

Every pupil has contributed a self-portrait that now adorns the hoardings on Westmoreland Road.

At the forefront of the operation were Year 6 pupils Milly Perrin, Jessica Christian, Brintha Yasodaran and Diya John, who each gave up their lunchtimes for six weeks to create the 320 different squares across 10 wooden boards. Using carbon paper they transferred the pupil’s drawing on to the panels and added a splash of colour which is intended to mirror the school colours of Manx tartan.

Milly said: ‘It was a long process but when you walk past you feel proud to say that we’ve done it.’

Some of the squares contain inspirational messages about the value of education.

‘I wanted the whole school community to be represented,’ said headteacher Ian Walmsley. ‘Pupils all created self-portraits and the older pupils transferred them on to the panels.’

He added: ‘It’s meant to work on a number of different levels. If you drive past it’s a splash of colour, as you get closer you can see the children’s faces and when people walk alongside they can read the quotes.’

John Corteen, site manager for building contractors Tooms, said: ‘We have been in regular discussion with the school regarding the project from the outset.

‘We thought decorative hoardings would give pupils the chance to feel involved.’

Back to the top of the page