We will study views closely

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: Education and Children Minister Eddie Teare MHK sought views on what the education system should deliver

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: Education and Children Minister Eddie Teare MHK sought views on what the education system should deliver

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MORE than 40 responses were received by the Department of Education and Children during public consultation on how well they think education prepares young people for the workplace.

The department launched the consultation on education provision for 14 to 18-year-olds and funding for those in higher education in April.

Education and Children Minister Eddie Teare MHK said he was grateful that so many individuals and organisations had taken the time to send in views.

‘These will now be studied closely and we will take them into account when shaping future policy,’ he said.

When he launched the consultation Mr Teare said: ‘In this highly competitive environment, we have to recognise that if the island is to prosper, our young people must be equipped with the skills to enable them to fully participate in the workplace.

‘Our economy has changed and the education system should also adapt.’

He said: ‘There are various opinions as to what the education system should deliver and we are seeking the views of the public.

‘The results of this consultation will not determine my policy in the very short-term, but will help my successor to plan the way forward after September’s General Election.’

The consultation asked for the public’s views on what the curriculum for 14- to 16-year-olds should look like.

Questions were based on what 16-year-olds should be like and how the curriculum must change to achieve that.

It asked how the curriculum can better prepare young people for the workplace and how the curriculum can engage all young people.

In addition, it asks what vocational pathways should be offered and how young people can be encouraged to engage in lifelong learning.

For sixth-form students, the department was keen to discover views on what proportion of courses should be general education (such as A-level) and how much should be vocational. It also asked whether what it calls ‘key pathways’ need to be available for post-16 students and how the curriculum can better prepare students for work.

In terms of higher education, questions included whether the DEC should prioritise funding for courses where there are skill shortages in the island.

And it asked whether higher grades at A-level should be needed to secure funding by the department for degrees which have ‘little or no immediate or obvious relevance to the Manx economy’.

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