Lessons learned from Glasgow bin wagon tragedy

The scene in Glasgow's George Square after a bin lorry crashed in the city centre and killed six people. Harry Clarke was at the wheel of the vehicle when it went out of control on December 22 last year, with witnesses reporting that he appeared to lose consciousness at the wheel. Picture:Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

The scene in Glasgow's George Square after a bin lorry crashed in the city centre and killed six people. Harry Clarke was at the wheel of the vehicle when it went out of control on December 22 last year, with witnesses reporting that he appeared to lose consciousness at the wheel. Picture:Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

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Several new measures have been implemented following the inquiry into the Glasgow refuse vehicle crash, Ramsey commissioners learned.

On December 22, 2014, a lorry collided with pedestrians in the Scottish city, killing six and injuring 15 others. The driver of the council-owned vehicle, Harry Clarke, said he had passed out at the wheel.

Chief technical officer Steve Harrison told the board that they had already implemented basic training for all refuse crew regarding braking mechanisms and emergency measures, should a driver fall ill at the wheel.

In addition, refuse collections are carried out at non-peak times in areas where there may be numbers of pedestrians, for example Parliament Street, where refuse collection is carried out during early mornings to prevent interaction with pedestrians when shops are open, particularly when reversing procedures are involved.

Mr Harrison also said that Dennis Eagle, manufacturers of refuse collection vehicles, had confirmed that, as a result of an exceptional number of enquiries, they would be issuing a guidance statement for all operators of their vehicles.

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