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Man is fined £2,000 for cutting trees

The trees that were cut on Port-e-Chee Meadow on the main road between Douglas and Union Mills

The trees that were cut on Port-e-Chee Meadow on the main road between Douglas and Union Mills

A man has been fined £2,000 plus costs for cutting trees registered under the Tree Preservation Act 1993.

Martin Marlow, of Quine’s Hill, Port Soderick, was convicted of lopping several mature lime trees at Port-e-Chee Meadow without permission from the Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture.

This resulted in a significant loss of what civil servants call ‘visual amenity’ in the area. In other words, the view was spoilt.

A DEFA spokesman said: ‘The lime trees at Port-e-Chee Meadow are of significant amenity value and are considered to be one of the finest avenues of lime trees on the island.

‘They were planted in 1935 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of King George V.’

DEFA said all tree owners, gardeners and contractors should know about the statutory protection provided to trees under the Tree Preservation Act 1993.

In general, trees with a stem diameter greater than 8cm measured at a point 152cms above ground, must be licensed by the department before they can be felled.

Additionally, any trees deemed as ‘registered’ under the Act require a licence before any work can be carried out on them. The Tree Preservation Act states that anyone found guilty of an offence is liable to a fine not exceeding £20,000.

 

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