Mountain Road closures defended

Police and paramedics attend a motorbike crash at Joey's - there were no serious injuries

Police and paramedics attend a motorbike crash at Joey's - there were no serious injuries

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Police have defended the decision to close the Mountain Road after every crash, insisting: ‘We can’t operate and have cars and bikes bowling towards us at over 150mph.’

On the Constabulary’s Facebook page, the roads police unit explained that safety was paramount.

Collision at Brandywell - visiting rider had a lucky escape

Collision at Brandywell - visiting rider had a lucky escape

This morning, the Mountain Road was closed between Ramsey Hairpin and the Bungalow after a biker came off at Joey’s. There were no serious injuries.

But a short time later, a further collision at Brandywell resulted in the entire mountain section from Ramsey to Creg-ny-Baa being shut.

Then at 4.15pm the Mountain Road was closed between Ramsey and the Bungalow following an accident at Guthtries. The road did not reopen before the practice session began. The rider involved was taken to hospital with potentially serious injuries.

The roads policing unit posted: ‘There seems to have been quite a bit of background chatter about why we seem to close the Mountain Road at the drop of a hat. Let’s try and explain a bit more.

‘Firstly, when a crash or incident is called in to us, we don’t know what we have got. The road may be blocked already, and there will be other vehicles bowling towards the crash at speeds in excess of twice that on a UK motorway. We have to stop that risk.

‘When we get there, we need everyone to be safe. That means the public, officers and other responders. We haven’t the luxury of building a contraflow, or closing lanes one and two as on a motorway - we have to shut it down to make it safe. We can’t operate and have cars and bikes bowling towards us at over 150mph.

‘And then, we need to clear the scene – to make it safe. That can often involve an hour with a sweeper and a lot of detergent, to get the oil and other debris off the road, and make sure that the next person that comes up there at speed has a better than evens chance of staying on it.

‘So, it’s all about safety. Simple as that.’

The comments prompted a lot of responses from posters who praised the police for their actions.

One posted: ‘Been going since 1985 and I have no problem at all with roads closed after an accident, it makes sense. The police there do a great job, carry on boys.’ Another said: ‘Maybe the people too dumb enough to have worked this out for themselves shouldn’t be riding up there in the first place.’

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