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Relic ‘Tynwald’ steam loco is leaving the Isle of Man for good

LEAVING HOME: The frames of Tynwald are lowered onto a lorry bound for Suffolk. PHOTO: John Maddrell JM120928 (14).

LEAVING HOME: The frames of Tynwald are lowered onto a lorry bound for Suffolk. PHOTO: John Maddrell JM120928 (14).

 

BUILT in 1880 as Isle of Man Railways No.7, Tynwald was dismantled as long ago as 1947 and its remains have until recently been on display at Castletown station.

But last week, the frames were lifted onto a lorry ready for it to leave the island for a final time.

It’s destination is Southwold in Suffolk, where enthusiasts are planning to restore a section of the narrow-gauge railway that once ran from the market town of Halesworth and which closed as far back in 1929.

Tynwald is privately owned by the Rugby-based Isle of Man Railways & Tramways Preservation Society whose chairman Robert Hendry became embroiled in a dispute 18 months ago with the Department of Community, Culture and Leisure over the storage of railway property of a number of locos he owned.

That dispute ended with the three of the engines returned to railway ownership for a nominal sum of £1.

Of these, one has returned to service and the other two, long mothballed, remain in storage pending the removal of asbestos lagging from their boilers.

It is understood that a six-wheeled coach also owned by Mr Hendry’s society will leave the island early next month also bound for Southwold.

The move to Suffolk came after a deal fell through to move No.7 to the West Clare Railway in Ireland, which is restoring a stretch of another long-closed line.

 

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