TT centenary marked with huge parade

BYGONE ERA:  Chris Lewis on a 1912 Triumph Roadster leads two others into the Goosneck with Ramsey Bay forming a spectacular backdrop. He describes the bike as having no clutch, no gears and not much brakes! The bike also took part in the 2007 TT centenary run at St John's

BYGONE ERA: Chris Lewis on a 1912 Triumph Roadster leads two others into the Goosneck with Ramsey Bay forming a spectacular backdrop. He describes the bike as having no clutch, no gears and not much brakes! The bike also took part in the 2007 TT centenary run at St John's

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SPECTATORS were transported back in time as 100 pre-war motorcycles roared away in a haze of exhaust smoke to commemorate a milestone in history on Sunday.

Riders from as far afield as New Zealand and America, not to mention Holland, the UK and the Isle of Man gathered to celebrate the birth one hundred years ago of the famous Mountain Course, used ever since for the TT races.

STARTER'S ORDERS: One of the riders prepares to set off from Quarter Bridge Road for Ramsey after the plaque unveiling ceremony

STARTER'S ORDERS: One of the riders prepares to set off from Quarter Bridge Road for Ramsey after the plaque unveiling ceremony

During a short pause on Quarter Bridge Road a plaque was unveiled, marking the precise location of the start line for the first Mountain Course race in 1911.

The island’s Lieutenant Governor Adam Wood did the honours after a short introduction from Alex Downie, MLC and Vintage Motorcycle Club member.

Riders and many supporters entered into the spirit of the event wearing as near to Edwardian costume as they could muster with an eclectic mix of vintage leathers, pudding basin helmets, tweeds, plus fours, gaiters and guantlets.

A lunch stop in Ramsey’s Parliament Square gave riders the chance for a breather and lunch while spectators could admire the machinery – all pre-World War Two and, in some cases dating to before 1914.

HISTORIC MILESTONE:  Lieutenant Governor Adam Wood admires the plaque he unveiled to mark the start line of the first TT run over the Mountain Course in 1911

HISTORIC MILESTONE: Lieutenant Governor Adam Wood admires the plaque he unveiled to mark the start line of the first TT run over the Mountain Course in 1911

Finally it was time to tackle the climb up towards Snaefell and the somewhat easier descent back to the TT Grandstand for tea, where the bikes remained on display for the afternoon.

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