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When cars raced Isle of Man TT

Veteran Car Company Ltd trip to IOM mark the centenary of the 1914 car T.T.races.
Cars are flagged away on there lap of the T.T.course by Lt Governor Adam Wood.

Veteran Car Company Ltd trip to IOM mark the centenary of the 1914 car T.T.races. Cars are flagged away on there lap of the T.T.course by Lt Governor Adam Wood.

  • by John Turner
 

Some of the original cars which raced in the final TT car race before the out break of World War One in 1914 made a return visit to the Isle of Man this week.

More than 40 cars made the trip, organised jointly by the North West section of the Veteran Car Club with support from the Manx Motor Racing Club.

The oldest cars taking part were a 1902 Panhard Levassor and a 1903 Darracq.

A Humber driven by Bill Wrather and a Sunbeam driven by Tim Moore both raced in the 1914 event – known as the ‘patriotic TT’ – when they were new.

This time, the cars concentrated on touring around the island, starting with a lap of the TT course, officially waved off from the TT Grandstand by Lieutenant Governor Adam Wood.

The 45 cars taking part this year marks a record entry for the event, which involved touring, social gatherings for the club members and some concours displays, including one on Douglas seafront.

There was a car to represent every year from 1902 to 1914.

Just six of the field of 23 cars finished the original race which was won by Kenelm Lee Guinness in a Sunbeam. Fastest lap of the event was completed at an average speed of 59mph.

The race comprised 16 laps of the TT Mountain Course, totalling 600 miles in two stages on consecutive days.

The rally also marks the 60th anniversary of events in the Isle of Man by the North West Veteran Car Club which first visited in 1954.

The cars covered around 600 miles during their latest visit which took in most of the towns and villages around the island, but at a somewhat more sedate pace than 100 years ago.

 

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