Drink-driver was badly injured after he lost control of his car and hit a telegraph pole

Wednesday 26th January 2022 5:25 am
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A drink-driver who crashed into a wall and telegraph pole has been banned from driving for two years and fined £1,350.

Michael Curphey Cowin was said to have broken numerous bones as a result of the crash in Santon.

Power lines also had to be repaired following the accident on October 14 last year.

Deputy High Bailiff James Brooks ordered Cowin, who is 49, to take an extended driving test at the end of the ban.

Prosecuting advocate Rebecca Cubbon told the court that police were called to Santon at 12.55am on October 14 after receiving a 999 call reporting an accident.

Cowin, who lives at Derby Road, Douglas, had to be cut from his Citroen by emergency services.

He was said to have lost control of the car near to the Santon Motel, hitting a telegraph pole, then a wall, before the car rolled.

Cowin was taken to hospital where a blood sample was taken which later produced a result of 127. The legal limit is 80.

When interviewed he said he had been in Port Erin and had drunk four glasses of wine at a friend’s house.

He said he had then been driving home but when he reached Santon, realised he had left his laptop at his friend’s home.

Cowin said he had then been heading back to Port Erin to get it when he scraped the kerb and lost control of the car.

He said he could recall hitting the wall but nothing else.

A vehicle examiner later deemed three of the tyres on his car to be defective.

Defence advocate Joseph Burrows said that his client had been taking medication for depression and had not been thinking rationally at the time.

’He was expecting to stay at his then-girlfriend’s house, but something occurred and he left,’ said the advocate.

’He was upset and made the irrational decision to drive. Conditions were wet and he suffered numerous broken bones. He is still suffering today.’

Mr Burrows went on to say that his client had lost two part-time jobs as a result but was still working part-time as an industrial cleaner.

The advocate continued: ’Mr Cowin had been looking to volunteer as a driver for St John Ambulance but that isn’t going to happen now.’

Deputy High Bailiff Mr Brooks ordered Cowin to pay the fine and costs at a rate of £40 per month.

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